Mono Rapid Tests

Infectious mononucleosis (referred to as “the kissing disease” from its oral transmission) is an infectious, widespread viral disease caused by the Epstein Barr virus, a type of herpes virus, which over 90% of adults are likely to have acquired immunity by the age of 40. In adolescents and young adults, the disease is characterized by fever, sore throat and fatigue, along with several other possible signs and symptoms. It is primarily diagnosed by observation of symptoms, but suspicion can be confirmed by rapid diagnostic mono tests. Mononucleosis is a self-limiting disease and little treatment is normally required, despite the sometimes painful and severe symptoms.

One of the more interesting features of mononucleosis is that once the acute symptoms of an initial infection disappear, they often do not return. But once infected, the patient carries the virus for the rest of their life. The virus lives dormant in B lymphocytes. Independent infections of mononucleosis may be contracted multiple times, regardless of whether the patient is already carrying the virus dormant. Periodically, the virus can reactivate, during which time the patient is again infectious, but usually without any symptoms of illness. Therefore an infected person could spread the disease, unknowingly through kissing or some other oral transmission. But usually, a patient has few, if any, further symptoms or problems from the latent B lymphocyte infection.

Patients who have had mononucleosis are sometimes vunerable to chronic fatigue syndrome. In 1987 scientists used the term chronic fatigue syndrome to describe a condition resembling “chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection” but which presented no evidence of EBV as its cause. It’s important to immediately test patients for the virus that causes mononucleosis to rule out other possibilities, including depression, IBS, fibromyalgia, and even diabetes, when they present symptoms that are not easily identifiable. One of the easiest ways to test for mononucleosis is with an in office mononucleosis test .

New: AimStrip Hemoglobin System,

The Fastest Handheld Hemoglobin MeterSpeed is often the enemy of quality, but in Germaine Labs new AimStrip Hemoglobin System, patient blood hemoglobin can be tested in under 15 seconds, without sacrificing accuracy or precision. At a busy clinic every second counts. Patients demand instant answers to their health questions and waiting for lab tests in the age of cell phones and Google seems antiquated to many patients. With handheld Hb blood testing, your staff can easily and quickly diagnose patients from information on their hemoglobin levels. This is especially useful for OB/GYN clinics and oncology clinics.

The fastest handheld hemoglobin meter is the Germaine AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter. The AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter is not only the fastest CLIA waived handheld hemoglobin meter on the market today, it is also available at QuickMedical right now. The AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter is the only hemoglobin test using reflectance photometry and the only handheld meter to offer both a hemoglobin and hemocrit test. While other tests utilize disposable cuvettes, the AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter utilizes a simple disposable strip. Other Hb tests go through control self tests, or even require calibration, but the AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter is uniquely, automatically calibrated on startup. Furthermore, the battery life of the AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter has been tested against other similar meters, and there is no other test that lasts as long on 3 AAA batteries than the AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter. It can perform around 2,700 tests without battery replacement. And with the test itself being complete in under 15 seconds, the AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter is the obvious choice for efficiency in a busy health facility.

For more information on the fastest handheld hemoglobin meter, the AimStrip Hemoglobin Meter from Germaine Labs, call QuickMedical and ask us.

PT/INR Testing

Coag-Sense: PT/INR Results for Medical ProfessionalsTwo million new people start taking the oral anticoagulant drug Coumadin (also known generically as warfarin) every year to prevent blood clots, heart attacks and stroke. Dosing of warfarin is complicated by the fact that it interacts with many commonly used medications and even with chemicals that may be present in certain foods. These interactions may enhance or reduce warfarin’s anticoagulation effect. In order to optimize the therapeutic effect without risking dangerous side effects such as bleeding, close monitoring of the degree of anti-coagulation is required by blood testing.

Correct dosing of warfarin is determined for each patient by periodically measuring blood clotting time using the prothrombin time or, as it’s commonly called, the PT test. The new Coag-Sense system offers clinicians a PT test with simplicity, performance, and reliability. The portable system is CLIA waived for physician office labs, and unlike electrochemical detection based devices, the Coag-Sense system does not rely on the concentration of blood constituents not involved in clot formation to produce results. This improves precision and reduces variability in readings often seen in other systems. The results of the Coag-Sense are comparable to gold standard WHO tilt-tube method.

The Coag-Sense meter directly measures the prothrombin time, so the time required to perform a test is the actual prothrombin time in seconds. There is no need for tables or curve-fitting algorithms— the Coag-Sense meter offers both speed and accuracy.

The Coag-Sense System is available exclusively through a network of qualified distributors, which includes QuickMedical. Contact us today and a trained product specialist will assist you in purchasing and setting up your Coag-Sense system.

md-admissions
Another reason why Coag-Sense  PT/INR tests are important!
mynotes4usmle:

WARFARIN-INDUCED SKIN NECROSIS
Warfarin necrosis usually occurs three to five days after drug therapy is begun, and a high initial dose increases the risk of its development.[3]:122 Heparin-induced necrosis can develop both at sites of localinjection and - when infused intravenously - in a widespread pattern.[3]:123
In warfarin’s initial stages of action, inhibition of protein C and Factor VII is stronger than inhibition of the other vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors II, IX and X. This results from the fact that these proteins have different half-lives: 1.5 to six hours for factor VII and eight hours for protein C, versus one day for factor IX, two days for factor X and two to five days for factor II. The larger the initial dose of vitamin K-antagonist, the more pronounced these differences are. This coagulation factor imbalance leads to paradoxical activation of coagulation, resulting in a hypercoagulable state and thrombosis. The blood clots interrupt the blood supply to the skin, causing necrosis. Protein C is an innate anticoagulant, and as warfarin further decreases protein C levels, it can lead to massive thrombosis with necrosis and gangrene of limbs.
Notably, the prothrombin time (or international normalized ratio, INR) used to test the effect of coumarins is highly dependent on factor VII, which explains why patients can have a therapeutic INR (indicating good anticoagulant effect) but still be in a hypercoagulable state.[1]
In one third of cases, warfarin necrosis occurs in patients with an underlying, innate and previously unknown deficiency of protein C. The condition is related to purpura fulminans, a complication in infants with sepsis (blood stream infection) which also involves skin necrosis. These infants often have protein C deficiency as well. There have also been cases in patients with other deficiency, including protein S deficiency,[6][7] activated protein C resistance (Factor V Leiden)[8] and antithrombin III deficiency.[9]
Although the above theory is the most commonly accepted theory, others believe that it is a hypersensitivity reaction or a direct toxic effect.[1]

Another reason why Coag-Sense  PT/INR tests are important!

mynotes4usmle:

WARFARIN-INDUCED SKIN NECROSIS

Warfarin necrosis usually occurs three to five days after drug therapy is begun, and a high initial dose increases the risk of its development.[3]:122 Heparin-induced necrosis can develop both at sites of localinjection and - when infused intravenously - in a widespread pattern.[3]:123

In warfarin’s initial stages of action, inhibition of protein C and Factor VII is stronger than inhibition of the other vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors IIIX and X. This results from the fact that these proteins have different half-lives: 1.5 to six hours for factor VII and eight hours for protein C, versus one day for factor IX, two days for factor X and two to five days for factor II. The larger the initial dose of vitamin K-antagonist, the more pronounced these differences are. This coagulation factor imbalance leads to paradoxical activation of coagulation, resulting in a hypercoagulable state and thrombosis. The blood clots interrupt the blood supply to the skin, causing necrosis. Protein C is an innate anticoagulant, and as warfarin further decreases protein C levels, it can lead to massive thrombosis with necrosis and gangrene of limbs.

Notably, the prothrombin time (or international normalized ratio, INR) used to test the effect of coumarins is highly dependent on factor VII, which explains why patients can have a therapeutic INR (indicating good anticoagulant effect) but still be in a hypercoagulable state.[1]

In one third of cases, warfarin necrosis occurs in patients with an underlying, innate and previously unknown deficiency of protein C. The condition is related to purpura fulminans, a complication in infants with sepsis (blood stream infection) which also involves skin necrosis. These infants often have protein C deficiency as well. There have also been cases in patients with other deficiency, including protein S deficiency,[6][7] activated protein C resistance (Factor V Leiden)[8] and antithrombin III deficiency.[9]

Although the above theory is the most commonly accepted theory, others believe that it is a hypersensitivity reaction or a direct toxic effect.[1]

What’s Up with This Picture?

It takes a pretty rare picture to be worth a whole blog. And maybe this picture isn’t really worth the entire blog. But maybe it is. We found this bizarre picture of an echocardiogram in progress, on WebMD to share with you. 

A Picture is Worth 300 Words
Who knew an Echocardiogram could be this sexy?

This picture is really strange. What’s the context? We found it on WebMD as part of a listicle slideshow about heart health. Pretty boring stuff, honestly, and then we clicked and— wow! Almost not safe work. Both patient and doctor are so serious looking, but that patient’s mustache telegraphs he’s ready to party once he gets up and out of that Gendron Bariatric Acute Care Bed. The red lighting gives the scene the flair of the old Storyville section of New Orleans. I can almost hear the clarinets.

Another weird thing about the picture is that the patient on first glance appears to be holding the medical stethoscope to his own chest. On closer inspection, I think it is the doctor’s hand, actually— but she has really big hands.

Finally, what’s most off-putting about the picture is the patient’s position. He’s reclining like a Roman aristocrat at a feast in an Italian gladiator movie. Yes, you have to lay sideways when you get an Echocardiogram, but do you have to do it like a satyr waiting for grapes to drop from the sky?

All joking aside, while we don’t carry echocardiogram technology at QuickMedical, we do have a a groundbreaking portable EKG monitor as well as professional supplies and equipment needed for EKG assessment. Electrocardiogram technology is essential for diagnosing and evaluating heart rhythm.

Cardiovascular health is extremely important. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the USA. If you need an electrocardiogram it’s probably not a laughing matter. But, someone did say laughter was the best medicine, so check your blood pressureregularly, watch your diet, get regular exercise, and don’t take things too seriously.

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What’s the QuickMedical difference? The difference is the QuickMedical experience, provided by our staff. The difference is our commitment to innovation and customer service.