The Most Shocking Moment in Pro Football

The Most Shocking Moment in Pro FootballIn 1905 there were 19 fatalities from college and semi-professional football games nationwide. President Theodore Roosevelt threatened to shut down the game if drastic changes were not made. In December of that same year, 62 schools met in New York City to discuss rule changes to make football safer. With that meeting the NCAA was born and the foundation for the modern game of American football was laid. However, football remained a dangerous sport and continues to be, even today. Injuries happen all the time. One of the most shocking injuries in football history happened in 1985 on a Monday Night Football game between the Washington Redskins and the New York Giants. In the 2nd quarter, Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann handed the ball off and dropped back, then in a trick play, he received the ball back in a lateral behind the line of scrimmage. He had the ball with the intention to pass, but was caught in a web of Giant’s linebackers, when Lawrence Taylor made a quick move and sacked Theismann.

Sportswriters have since named the injury the most shocking moment in pro football history…

Read the full story

The Mystery of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Vaccinations have been a source of controversy since they were invented in the late 18th century. Vaccinations can often cause side effects, and even today the science of the immune system is not fully understood. Consequently, there have been a variety of movements against vaccinations. Mass vaccinations have almost eradicated deadly diseases like smallpox and polio. But some researchers believe these mass vaccinations have caused more harm than good. Some even believe there are sinister motives behind the medical establishment performing the vaccinations. In 1976, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, a rare autoimmune disease appeared in 10 per one million individuals who had received a swine flu immunization. Was it the vaccine that caused the syndrome? Let’s separate the fact and fiction and solve the mystery of Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

In 1976, an outbreak of H1N1 flu virus was reported at Fort Dix in New Jersey. This outbreak was in reality, only 4 recruits who contracted the swine flu. Unfortunately, panic set in when one of the soldiers died from the virus within a few days. Believing it could be the beginning of a pandemic, the CDC began a multi-million dollar flu vaccination effort. 40 million people were immunized at the time against swine flu. Then across 10 states, 54 cases of the extremely rare Guillain-Barre Syndrome were reported. Acting again on panic, and the fact that the swine flu outbreak did not seem to be as severe as originally thought, the immunization effort was abruptly stopped.

Mystery Monday: Guillain-Barre Syndrome
Above: President Ford getting a flu shot.

Guillain-Barre Syndrome is a very frightening and mysterious disease, especially for those affected by it. The symptoms include sudden muscle pain, weakness and lethargy, followed by paralysis, starting in the extremities and then continuing throughout the body. If the diaphragm becomes paralyzed, it can cause death. As quickly and mysteriously as the disease takes hold, it can disappear.

Later research has shown that because the syndrome is so rare, and the vaccinations of 1976, so widespread, it’s difficult to assess whether the vaccine was really increasing the risk for GBS. Furthermore, the syndrome may not have been directly due to the vaccine, but to a bacterial contamination of the vaccine, based on new research on the causes of GBS.

Fear of vaccinations in the present day can be traced to the 1976 events. The internet is filled with stories that vaccinations cause a variety of diseases, including cancers and HIV. There are even extreme opponents who claim that mass vaccinations are purposefully used by the government to gain control over the population. These fears don’t make sense. The push for mass vaccination in 1976 was just as capricious as the abrupt ending. The same fear-based strategy that lead the government to begin mass vaccination seems to be the same fear based strategy that ended it. Fears of vaccination have been around since the late 18th century and are fueled by the mysterious nature of disease and illness.

The benefits of vaccination for deadly diseases outweigh the side effects. Though, the debate is likely to continue, in 2005, in Indiana a popular belief against vaccination lead to a real outbreak of measles. Likewise in Nigeria, a backlash against Western medicine in 2001 lead to a resurgence of polio. 

The belief in vampires has spawned “lifestyle vampires” who are not actual vampires, but vampire enthusiasts who engage in some fairly interesting and somewhat shocking activities. Many “lifestyle vampires” are simply people who gather together with a similar interest in “goth” culture, horror fiction, and unique philosophical systems. “Lifestyle vampires” are often exploring alternative sexual activities through their lifestyle. There are numerous scientific sexual studies of patients with sexual attraction to blood— including others and even their own. Some “lifestyle vampires” are focused only on energy or psychic vampirism, which deals only with feeding from auras, pranic energy, or other types of psychic energy. But there are actually a few people called “Sanguinarians” who drink blood.

 

Sanguinarians think of themselves as “real vampires” and usually have a collective community. The internet has made connecting with these communities much easier. Sanguinarians believe they have a physical and/or spiritual need to drink human blood to maintain their mental and physical health. Sanguinarians are not murdering others to drink their blood— at least as far as we know. Instead, this small group of “lifestyle vampires” practices blood letting and blood drinking among consensual adults. It’s obviously not for everyone, but Sanguinarians have come to QuickMedical to make sure their bloody activities are safe.

 

An interesting discussion atSanguinarius.Org which is a large site/discussion board for “lifestyle vampires” and their friends and supporters featured a now discontinued number of lancets and lancing devices available at QuickMedical for safe blood letting. A user known as “Sanguinarius” has detailed several tips for safely and sanely obtaining blood on the site and other users have used QuickMedical products for consensual blood letting activities.

 

At QuickMedical we have medical equipment and supplies for phlebotomists and medical equipment and supplies for vampires! Either way, you’ll get the best customer service and a great price. QuickMedical urges our readers— whether you are trick-or-treating tonight, going to a party, watching a scary movie, or drinking a friend’s blood— do it safely. Have a happy and safe Halloween!

http://www.quickmedical.com/phlebotomist.html

tuesday-johnson
tuesday-johnson:

forposterite:

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1870, [carte de visite portrait of what appears to be a Ku Klux Klan member in full costume], Harley, Metcalf & Winter

The Klan was organized after the Civil War by Nathan Bedford Forest. Its members wore black costumes with skulls and crossbones and terrorized newly-freed black citizens of the South as well as northern “carpetbaggers”. Their gruesome images appeared in periodicals of the time. Various outrages prompted Congressional investigations in 1871 and condemnation by President Grant and others. The night rider has the initials or word “MED” on the front of his costume and yields an ax. 

via Heritage Auctions

This looks more like a member of the Med Fac Society, a secret Harvard student club.

Oh man, thanks so much for bringing the Med Fac to my attention; I had never heard of them before this comment. I totally agree, this very well might be a member.
The Med Facs (short for “Medical Faculty”) of Harvard were a secretive group upperclassmen who basically considered themselves doctors of destruction and physicians of havoc. From 1818 to the early 20th century, campus pranks were their forte. According to the Harvard Crimson and the New York Times the Med Facs are credited in blowing up the campus pump, vandalizing, tagging, and stealing rare books and manuscripts from the campus library. To be accepted into the society, a prank was to be committed that was serious enough to result in expulsion from the school if caught.
The secretive nature of, and ‘MED’ lettering on this man’s unusual outfit might suggest a relationship with the Med Facs rather than the Ku Klux Klan.

tuesday-johnson:

forposterite:

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1870, [carte de visite portrait of what appears to be a Ku Klux Klan member in full costume], Harley, Metcalf & Winter

The Klan was organized after the Civil War by Nathan Bedford Forest. Its members wore black costumes with skulls and crossbones and terrorized newly-freed black citizens of the South as well as northern “carpetbaggers”. Their gruesome images appeared in periodicals of the time. Various outrages prompted Congressional investigations in 1871 and condemnation by President Grant and others. The night rider has the initials or word “MED” on the front of his costume and yields an ax.

via Heritage Auctions

This looks more like a member of the Med Fac Society, a secret Harvard student club.

Oh man, thanks so much for bringing the Med Fac to my attention; I had never heard of them before this comment. I totally agree, this very well might be a member.

The Med Facs (short for “Medical Faculty”) of Harvard were a secretive group upperclassmen who basically considered themselves doctors of destruction and physicians of havoc. From 1818 to the early 20th century, campus pranks were their forte. According to the Harvard Crimson and the New York Times the Med Facs are credited in blowing up the campus pump, vandalizing, tagging, and stealing rare books and manuscripts from the campus library. To be accepted into the society, a prank was to be committed that was serious enough to result in expulsion from the school if caught.

The secretive nature of, and ‘MED’ lettering on this man’s unusual outfit might suggest a relationship with the Med Facs rather than the Ku Klux Klan.

biomedicalephemera

biomedicalephemera:

Babies From Space

…ok, just babies in a sun-bed.

These babies in an orphanage are getting a sun-bath, which was once a common procedure during the winter months in order to stave off vitamin D deficiency in those who couldn’t or didn’t go outside.

The skin produces vitamin D when it’s exposed to the sun, and without vitamin D, the body can’t absorb or utilize calcium, resulting in weakened bones and a host of other problems, which, when it occurs in children, is called “rickets”. In adults, chronic vitamin D or phosphorus deficiency leads to osteomalacia, which is a similar condition, but does not lead to stunted growth, obviously.

The stylish goggles protect the baby’s eyes, as they’re easily damaged by direct exposure to ultraviolet light.

Learn more about rickets, scurvy, and other historic nutritional disorders, in my recent mental_floss article.

medicalschool
medicalschool:

Tattoo (at 20x Magnification)
Before the development of modern tattooing methods, a wide variety of techniques were utilized. Many Native American tribes, for instance, rubbed pigments into prick marks or scratches to produce tattoos, and in other parts of the world a number of different implements, from thorns and knives to small rake-like instruments and needles followed by pigment-coated thread have been utilized to make permanent markings on the skin. Indeed, there are almost as many ways to create a tattoo as there have been cultures that practiced tattooing. The unusual art form has been known to humans for at least several thousand years, a mummy dating from about 3,300 BC exhibiting what is believed to be the most primitive evidence of tattoos. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Germans, Britons, and other early societies are also known to have utilized tattoos for various purposes, though the rise of Christianity led to their disappearance in Europe for many centuries.

medicalschool:

Tattoo (at 20x Magnification)

Before the development of modern tattooing methods, a wide variety of techniques were utilized. Many Native American tribes, for instance, rubbed pigments into prick marks or scratches to produce tattoos, and in other parts of the world a number of different implements, from thorns and knives to small rake-like instruments and needles followed by pigment-coated thread have been utilized to make permanent markings on the skin. Indeed, there are almost as many ways to create a tattoo as there have been cultures that practiced tattooing. The unusual art form has been known to humans for at least several thousand years, a mummy dating from about 3,300 BC exhibiting what is believed to be the most primitive evidence of tattoos. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Germans, Britons, and other early societies are also known to have utilized tattoos for various purposes, though the rise of Christianity led to their disappearance in Europe for many centuries.